wordpress blog stats

A Greater Introduction To Anchel!

Last week, I introduced you to the ever fabulous Anchel. I was able to twist her rubber arm enough to guest post for me here. She’s pretty awesome, and I’m sure you’ll love her as much as I do! Thanks for blogging for me, hon! You’re welcome anytime! There are several links within this post for your reading pleasure about Anchel, her family and her beautiful daughter Syona who is almost 2. She’s a cutie for sure!

Why Cerebral Palsy Doesn’t Rule This Roost-

Confession: More than anything, my two-year-old daughter, Syona, is a complete diva.

Confession number two: It’s all our fault. She’s our first (and for now, only) daughter, the first granddaughter and niece on my family’s side and the first local grandchild on my husband’s side of the family. I think confession number two pretty much explains the first confession.

She also loves music, but is pretty picky about her choices (currently Bruno Mars is a favourite. Before you ask, no, I’m not kidding. Michael Jackson is also a playlist staple, as is will.i.am’s Sesame Street What I Am song , has slept through the night a total of FOUR times in her 23 months on this earth (yes, we’re tired) and really enjoys a variety of foods. We try and visit our local park on an almost-daily basis because Syona loves the swings. She’s starting to pay attention to other kids, which is kind of a cool thing to watch. She’s extremely strong- willed and opinionated. And knock-on-wood, Syona is mostly a happy kid.

Guess what? She also happens to have cerebral palsy.

Guess what else? Cerebral palsy is not the defining part of our life.

When we first got Syona’s diagnosis  it overwhelmed our whole existence. It forced us to look at our life, let go of our expectations and really, genuinely, accept things as they happened . Not an easy task for a (former) type-A personality like myself. We even made some pretty big changes to our life. I was always a career-driven gal and assumed I would return to work following my year of maternity leave. I didn’t. Instead I spent the first several months as a newly-minted Stay-At-Home-Mom figuring out Syona’s therapies, our schedule and filling out paperwork (essentially I was her administrative assistant). And while I left my career of strategic communications and public relations behind (for now), I got back to my journalism school roots and am the special needs parenting blogger over at Today’s Parent.

As the months have progressed things have settled down. Our schedule remains hectic,  which I expect will continue (and I think it’s the same for most families, special needs or not). I don’t spend the days focused on the fact that she can’t sit independently, crawl, or walk. I don’t spend my time worried about her lack of speech or the seemingly constant stream of drool coming from her mouth. I do spend my time praying that tonight will be the start of her sleeping through the night, that she will eat a lot of food at her next meal and crossing my fingers that two specialist appointments don’t get booked at the same time.

One thing that cerebral palsy and Syona’s complicated beginnings have given me is a different perspective. It sounds like a cliché but I celebrate the fact that she is here, each and every day (yes even the moments that she annoys me more than any living being on earth, that underlying appreciation of her life is always there). I celebrate what she can do all the time. I laugh each time she giggles when anyone says the word “Funny.” I smile when I see the sheer joy on her face as we push her on the swings. And my heart swells with pride when she makes a loud “Haaaa” breath out sound as she attempts to say “Hi.”

There are a lot of people out there that don’t seem to understand how we can be so happy when our child has been diagnosed with a condition that means a future of unknowns. It’s simple. Most days, she’s not my little girl who has cerebral palsy. She’s just my little girl.

How do you keep balance in your family?

***

Anchel Krishna is a freelance writer and mother of one in the Toronto area. With
an educational background in journalism and professional experience in strategic
communications, Anchel now focuses on taking care of her toddler while attempting to
string together coherent sentences. She is also the special needs parenting blogger for
Today’s Parent.

You can connect with her on Twitter or email her at Anchel.writer@gmail.com.

Comments

  1. You are a beautiful family! My nephew has CP and it took a long time for him to sleep through the night, too but it will happen! Cheryl has told me about you, so I’m going to go off now and read some of your stories. :)
    Rhea recently posted..Five Daily Things

    • Thanks so much, Rhea – that is so sweet! I’m a big fan of Cheryl so was super excited when she asked me to do a guest post :) Feel free to leave comments over at Today’s Parent (they and I love that sort of thing :) Those are good words of encouragement about Syona’s sleep…I figure it has to happen someday!!! Thanks again for reading!
      Anchel recently posted..An open letter to Matthew Walzer

  2. Thanks for sharing Anchel and her story with us.

    I couldn’t find the “complicated beginnings” document but I saw that the URL mentioned “NICU”. My Triplets were born at 30 weeks and spent a lot of time in the NICU. Unfortunately, my son Alexander passed away in there.

    My story is not what I had planned as it appears neither was yours but try to remember that life is short.

    Your daughter is so lucky to have you as parents as you are lucky to have her.

    Besos, Sarah
    Zookeeper at Journeys of The Zoo
    Sarah De Diego (Journeysof TheZoo) recently posted..Summer Vacation. Everything and The Kitchen Sink.

    • Hi Sarah –

      Thanks so much for reading. Here’s the link to the piece you mentioned: http://www.todaysparent.com/blogs/special-needs-parenting/nicu-daughters-first-weeks (this one should work).

      I’m looking forward to reading your story.

      It’s funny – in some ways, Syona having CP has opened up our life and heart in so many ways that I wouldn’t have been otherwise exposed to. It’s funny, because as soon as I let go of my expectations and the way I thought things would turn out, I realized that things are turning out much better than I expected…it just looks different than what I originally thought it would!

      I usually post over at Today’s Parent every Tuesday. Given the name of your blog, I think you might find tomorrow’s post very interestesting! :)

      Anchel
      Anchel recently posted..An open letter to Matthew Walzer

  3. Hi Anchel! I think it’s great that you realize that CP doesn’t define your daughter or your family. We are all just parents to our beautiful children and we all go through the ups and downs of that. My children are 2 & 4 and I can tell you that combined, they have slept through the night about 5 times, lol. I’ve read your posts at Today’s Parent as well and really enjoyed the one about social media improving your parenting. Keep up the great work, you have a beautiful family!

    • Thanks, Chris….originally we were thinking of having more kids, but now you’ve just convinced me that our family is complete ;) I jest of course….but if we do have more I’m definitely going to be walking around with a caffeine IV drip!

      I absolutely love social media. I’ve met so many awesome people (i.e. Cheryl) and had an opportunity to meet in real life as well. And even simply reading a comment on a blog and having a chance to respond, really turned things around in terms of developing a sense of community for me. I just love it.

      Thanks for reading our story over at Today’s Parent…always appreciated :) Looking forward to reading about your experiences as well!
      Anchel recently posted..An open letter to Matthew Walzer

  4. What an amazing family, thank you for introducing her to us! I’ve known a few people who have CP and I’m amazed at how content they are and how they make the most of everything. We are familiar with having an unknown future (as my hubby as Muscular Dystrophy), but it’s just best to take things day by day and be very appreciative of what you already have in life and happy, like you mentioned! Your daughter is so blessed to have you in her life :) Support is everything!
    Brandi recently posted..CoverYourHair Review & Giveaway

    • Hi Branda – That is so sweet, thank you. We are so blessed as a family…Syona teaches me something new each and every day.

      Love what you say about being appreciative of what you already have…so true. I’m a little familiar with MD. Both my husband’s aunt and uncle (on his mom’s side) have MD. They actually started a centre in India for children with disabilities. It’s amazing to see what they have been able to accomplish despite their physical limitations.

      Hope you guys are doing well and wishing all of you lots of healthy thoughts. Thanks for reading!
      Anchel recently posted..An open letter to Matthew Walzer

  5. Oops…sorry for the typo in your name!
    Anchel recently posted..An open letter to Matthew Walzer

  6. What a beautiful family you have! And I love how positive you are! In life, that will get you very far!
    Wendy [mapsgirl] recently posted..yes, I let my 7 year old go to camp, so what?

  7. Beautifully said “Most days, she’s not my little girl who has cerebral palsy. She’s just my little girl.” I wish more people would understand that people who have CP are people first before they are people who have CP. I’m funny, smart and generous but most people can’t see past my wheelchair it’s really sad oh well people who can’t see me for who I truly am are not worth my time or my tears.
    Nisha recently posted..Day 713

Trackbacks

  1. [...]  met Anchel on a cerebral palsy group (on Facebook). We learned that we lived somewhat close to each other so, [...]

Speak Your Mind

*

CommentLuv badge